Last edited by Tolmaran
Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of The ripe moment and hurting stalemate found in the catalog.

The ripe moment and hurting stalemate

Ramses Amer

The ripe moment and hurting stalemate

what relevance for conflict resolution in the Asian context?

by Ramses Amer

  • 291 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Southeast Asian Conflict Studies Network in Penang, Malaysia .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Zartman, I. William -- Criticism and interpretation.,
  • Conflict management -- Asia.,
  • Asia -- Politics and government -- 1945-

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 38-41).

    Statementby Ramses Amer.
    SeriesPeace and conflict research report / Southeast Asian Conflict Studies Network -- no. 1
    The Physical Object
    Pagination41 p. ;
    Number of Pages41
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22794800M
    ISBN 109832514142
    LC Control Number2007441997

      “The timing of peace initiatives: Hurting stalemates and ripe moments” Global Review of Ethnopolitics 1 1 8 18 Zartman I.W. “The timing of peace initiatives: Hurting stalemates and ripe moments” Global Review of Ethnopolitics 1 1 8 18)| false.   NFL GameDay Morning LIVE HD | ANALYSIS & PREDICTIONS Week 4 | NFL Total Access on NFL Network NFL GameDay watching Live now.

    Hurting Stalemate’ (MHS), a situation where the conflicting parties sense their positions in a hurting impasse. The concept of a ripe moment does not only centre on the parties’ perception of a MHS but is optimally associated with an impending, past or recently avoided catastrophe. Even though the catastrophe is not necessary to either the. blocked. Practitioners need to take advantage of this ‗ripe moment‘ when it exists, or help produce it, or stand ready to act on it when it does not exist. The concept of a ripe moment centres on the relative parties‘ perception of a Mutually Hurting Stalemate (MHS), .

      After laying out the basic components of William Zartman's ripeness theory, which sees the "mutually hurting stalemate" as a ripe moment in which two conflicting parties see their respective positions as mutually harmful and are therefore ready to seek to resolve their conflict, Zeb (Institute of Regional Studies, Pakistan) and Chandran. Key concepts such as ripe moments, hurting stalemates, and collapsed states, are built upon in order to show how conflict resolution theory may be applied to contemporary challenges, particularly in Africa. Other issues dealt with in the book include the negotiation of relations with Europe, the role of culture in African conflict.


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The ripe moment and hurting stalemate by Ramses Amer Download PDF EPUB FB2

Azerbaijan is not ripe for such moves for mediation.’ (AFP 17 May ). The concept of a ripe moment centers on the parties' perception of a Mutually Hurting Stalemate (MHS), optimally associated with an impending, past or recently avoided catastrophe (Zartman and Berman ; Zartman ; Touval and ZartmanFile Size: KB.

One could hardly advise: in cost-benefit cultures, create a hurting stalemate as a ripe moment; in true-believer cultures, exhibit contrition as a ripe moment.

That is, however, what happened in the Pueblo incident between the United States and North Korea, an incident cited more frequently as. Zartman explained that “turning points” should herald the ripe moment.

But at the core of the ripe moment, he outlined three conditions – a mutually hurting stalemate, a presence of valid spokespersons and a formula for a way out – that were necessary for successful negotiations.

Second, the notion of military de-escalation, usually associated with 'the moment of hurting stalemate', implicating temporality of conflicts, contrasts the ever-changing conflict dynamics and.

By Eric Brahm September Once conflicts escalate for awhile, they often reach a stalemate: a situation in which neither side can win, but neither side wants to back down or accept loss either.

Stalemates emerge for a number of reasons: failed tactics, depletion of available resources to fuel the conflict, a reduction in support of the conflict by group members or allies, or costs becoming. The concept of a ripe moment centers on the parties' perception of a mutually hurting stalemate (MHS) -- a situation in which neither side can win, yet continuing the conflict will be very harmful to each (although not necessarily in equal degree nor for the same reasons).

Abstract. While most studies on peaceful settlement of disputes see the substance of the proposals for a solution as the key to a successful resolution of conflict, a growing focus of attention shows that a second and equally necessary key lies in the timing of efforts for resolution.

1 Parties resolve their conflict only when they are ready to do so — when alternative, usually unilateral. questions whether the ”mutual hurting stalemates” and “ripe moment” concept may not be in current use by the international community as a rationalization for inaction. Introduction. Finding a ripe moment requires research and intelligence studies to identify the objective and subjective tive expressions of pain, impasse, and inability to bear the cost of further escalation, related to objective evidence of stalemate, data on numbers and nature of casualties and material costs, and/or other such indicators of.

The ripe moment arises during the passing of phase one into two when parties discuss what they want to resolve, and become aware of whether a non-violent solution is feasible at all (ibid, ). Although Zartman insists that ripeness is absolutely necessary for successfully concluding peace talks, he also cautions that ripeness is a condition.

Mooradian, M & Druckman, D. ‘Hurting Stalemate or Mediation. The Conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh, ’ in Journal of Peace Research, Vol, No.6, (). pp Zartman, I. ‘The Timing of Peace Initiatives: Hurting Stalemates and Ripe Moments’ in The Global Review of Ethnopolitics, Vol.1, No.1 (September ).

pp Zartman explains that "a ripe moment comprises three elements: pains and losses (hurting stalemate), deadlock, and the realization of this deadlock by all the parties". A 'ripe moment' is when all the stakeholders realize that they are facing a huge increase in costs and there is a major drop in the perceived probability of success in.

Think of a low-hanging fruit that can only be picked when it is ripe. With this in mind, Zartman states that two factors must be present in conflict for the situation to be ripe: both sides must be in a hurting stalemate and both sides must be optimistic about a.

The Timing of Peace Initiatives: Hurting Stalemates and Ripe Moments. William Zartman. Pages Cultivating Peace: a Practitioner’s View of Deadly Conflict and Negotiation. John Paul Lederach. Pages About this book. Introduction. 'hurting stalemate', 'ripe moment' and 'ripe for resolution.

In the following, studies published since will be examined in order to follow how Zartman utilizes these key concepts. In a study from on conflict resolution, Zartmans analyses the 'ripe moment' and its linkage to a 'hurting stalemate.

Zartman explained “turning points” that should herald "the ripe moment". But at the core of "the ripe moment", he outlined three conditions (mutually hurting stalemate, presence of valid spokespersons and a formula for a way out) as necessary for negotiations.

Zartman terms this stage the ripe moment for intervention for conflict resolution. This moment is also known as the stage of Mutually hurting stalemate. Parties attain this position either due to the changing dynamics of war or natural calamities.

Later Ury in his book The Third Side() stressed that there is a need of a third and. Item does not have an ISSN or ISBN set. Zartman IW (). Ripeness: The hurting stalemate and beyond.

In: International Conflict Resolution After the Cold War. Eds. Stern, P. & Druckman, D., Washington: National Academy Press. Full text not available from this repository. Zartman claims that conflicts can best be tackled when an opportunity in form of a “hurting stalemate” in terms of eg.

a change in power relations, a military setback or the failure to impose a unilateral outcome, presents itself. This is usually referred to as the “ripe moment”. “hurting stalemate” is more effectively measured as the long-term change in the amount of conflict measured across a number of months than in the levels of conflict.

This measure of “hurting stalemate” correlates both with the onset of negotiation among the antagonists in the conflict, and significantly declines following negotiation.

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Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them., Free ebooks since Evaluating "Ripeness" and "Hurting Stalemate" in Mediated International Conflicts: An Event Data Study of the Middle East, Balkans, and West Africa.[14] The concept of a ripe moment centres on the parties’ perception of a Mutually Hurting Stalemate (MHS), optimally associated with an impending, past or recently avoided catastrophe.